Standardized Business AR
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Architecture and AR: A match made in heaven

Architecture and AR: A match made in heaven

There are many industries that can benefit from integrating Augmented Reality into their processes, but this blog will focus on one in particular: design and architecture.

 

The biggest challenge in architecture is to get a client to properly visualise design of the project. Many architects went from 2D plans to 3D models in the past decades in order to create a better representation of the project. By now, there are better options: 3D models on a desktop do not compare to the same models visualised in Augmented Reality. With AR, the model can be displayed on a table just like a real-life model – and even more, a model can be scaled up to its actual size, something that desktop drawings cannot provide. With this method, the client can visualise and even ‘explore’ the a building that does not yet exist, enabling them to find out details such as the height of the ceilings, the actual size of the rooms, the layout, etc. While a similar experience could be delivered with Virtual Reality, it has the clear drawback that it completely isolates the user from the real world, whereas AR overlays it.

 

Another area in which AR can aid the architecture industry is through marketing. People are naturally drawn to something that allows them to interact, to get to know the final product better and to experience it themselves. The experience people have during a digital walkthrough of their future homes is greater than viewing the model on a two dimensional surface.

 

Yet another key benefit of using AR in architecture is that it is very cost effective. In a way, a 1:1 overlay of a building can compared to Building laser scanning.  However, although an AR 1:1 overlay can be used to overlay different parts of the project, for example the layout of internal piping systems, electricity cables, different floors or levels, etc., there is a slight deviation (1/2cm), which means it is not as precise as laser scanning. Nevertheless, it is only a fraction of the cost. Such an AR 1:1 overlay is sufficient to spot deviations from the project in the early stages in order to repair them and save costs further down the line.

 

Our platform sphere contains a module that is specifically designed for the architecture and design industry – WORKSPACE. It covers all the use cases mentioned in this article and beyond! With this module you can carry out meetings in AR with different participants, discuss 3D models in AR and collaborate in a digital workspace, even with colleagues who are miles apart. What’s more, we have created an automated pipeline that converts any files into AR files that can be then visualized with the right AR hardware.

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